Analyse Baldwin’s account of the tension between integrationist and separatist responses to racial injustice by Black Americans.

Feb 15, 2024

Analyse Baldwin’s account of the tension between integrationist and separatist responses to racial injustice by Black Americans.

3500-Word Comparative Essay
What is Baldwins’ and Collins’ analysis of Racial injustice?

  • Find a point of contrast
  • Reflection: what’s interesting, confusing, wrong; find hooks.
  • Addressing a central theme.
  • It is a comparative essay, but it should not be descriptive. Create a
    theme/question based on their work.
  • Demonstrate what’s interesting or confusing, etc
  • The 2 chosen thinkers are provided below with its main themes and the
    sources are also given – please use the given sources + additional sources
    can be used if it gives value to the essay/argument.
    The Chosen Thinkers:
    1- James Baldwins
    His work: The fire next time
    • Analyse Baldwin’s account of the tension between integrationist and
    separatist responses to racial injustice by Black Americans.
    • Evaluate Baldwin’s analysis of the role of religion in fostering racial
    injustice in the United States.
    • Evaluate Baldwin’s claim that it is the duty of White and Black Americans
    to come together to overcome racial injustice.
    2- Patricia Hill Collins
    Her Work: Black Feminist Thought
    • Identify the meaning of “black feminist thought” and the reasons it has
    been obscured and marginalised in the context of American political
    thought – link to racial injustice.
    • Analyse the way that Black women’s oppression devalues their
    intellectual and political activism.
    To consider: What it feels like to the thinkers, their ideas, racial myths, letter to the
    nephew (fire next time) learn to love white despite, negative images, oppression,
    how society see/view black individuals and how black individuals see themselves,
    point of contrast: how to cope with racial injustice, have a relationship with white
    people despite the racial injustice, survival as a form of coping, Cope with
    oppression.
    Sources: James Baldwin
    Baldwin, James. The Fire Next Time (London: Penguin, 2017).
    Brim, Matt. James Baldwin and the Queer Imagination (Ann Arbor: The University
    of Michigan Press, 2014).
    Drexler-Dreis, Joseph. “James Baldwin’s Decolonial Loves as Religious
    Orientation,” Journal of Africana Religions, Vol. 3, No. 3 (2015), 251-278.
    Field, Douglas. “Looking for Jimmy Baldwin: Sex, Privacy, and Black Nationalist
    Fervor,” Callaloo, Vol. 27, No. 2 (2004), 457-480.
    Field, Douglas. “Pentecostalism and All that Jazz: Tracing James Baldwin’s
    Religion,” Literature & Theology, Vol. 22, No. 4 (2008), 436-457.
    Lyne, Bill. “God’s Black Revolutionary Mouth: James Baldwin’s Black
    Radicalism,” Science & Society, Vol. 74, No. 1 (2010), 12-36.
    Marshall, Stephen. The City on the Hill from Below: The Crisis of Prophetic Black
    Politics (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2011. See, Chapter 4: “(Making)
    love in the dishonorable City: The Civic Poetry of James Baldwin”.
    Norman, Brian. “Reading a ‘Closet Screenplay’: Hollywood, James Baldwin’s
    Malcolms and the Threat of Historical Irrelevance,” African American Review, Vol.
    39, No. ½ (2005), 103-118.
    Norman, Brian. “Crossing Identitarian Lines: Women’s Liberation and James
    Baldwin’s Early Essays,” Women’s Studies, Vol. 35, No. 3 (2006), 241-264.
    Ambar, Saladin. Reconsidering American Political Thought: A New Identity (New
    York and Oxon: Routledge, 2020). [Chapter Seven]
    *Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the
    Politics of Empowerment (New York and London: Routledge, 2009). Especially,
    chapters 2, 5, and 9.
    Collins, Patricia Hill. “On Violence, Intersectionality and Transversal
    Politics,” Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 40, No. 9 (2017), 1460-1473.
    Forum. “Thinking Intersectionally with Patricia Hill Collins,” The Journal of
    Speculative Philosophy, Vol. 26, No. 2 (2012), 442-473.
    Kersch, Ken. American Political Thought: An Invitation (Cambridge and Medford:
    Polity, 2021). [Chapter Eight]
    Roundtable. “Patricia Hill Collins’ Black Sexual Politics,” Studies in Gender and
    Sexuality, Vol. 9, No. 1 (2008), 1-85.
    Symposia. “The Contributions of Patricia Hill Collins,” Gender & Society, Vol. 26,
    No. 1 (2012), 14-72.
    Symposia. “Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought,” Ethnic and Racial
    Studies, Vol. 18, No. 13 (2015), 2314-2354.
    Sources to Use: Patricia Hill Collins
    Austin, Algernon. “Theorizing Difference within Black Feminist Thought: The
    Dilemma of Sexism in Black Communities,” Race, Gender & Class, Vol. 6, No. 3
    (1999), 52-66.
    Chepp, Valerie. “Black feminist theory and the politics of irreverence: The case of
    women’s rap,” Feminist Theory, Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015), 207-226.
    Collins, Patricia Hill. From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and
    Feminism (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006).
    *Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the
    Politics of Empowerment (New York and London: Routledge, 2009). Especially,
    chapters 10, 11, and 12.
    Collins, Patricia Hill. “Piecing Together a Genealogical Puzzle: Intersectionality and
    American Pragmatism,” European Journal of Pragmatism, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2011), 88-
    112.
    Cooper, Brittney C. “Love No Limit: Towards a Black Feminist Future (In
    Theory),” The Black Scholar: Journal of Black Studies and Research, Vol. 45, No. 4
    (2015), 7-21.
    Dotson, Kristie, “Between Rocks and Hard Places: Introducing Black Feminist
    Professional Philosophy,” The Black Scholar: Journal of Black Studies and
    Research, Vol. 46, No. 2 (2016), 46-56.
    James, V. Denise. “Musing: A Black Feminist Philosopher: Is That
    Possible? Hypatia, Vol. 29, No. 1 (2014), 189-195.
    Johnson, Latoya. “From the Anti-Slavery Movement to Now: (Re)Examining the
    Relationship Between Crticial Race Theory and Black Feminist Thought,” Race,
    Gender & Class, Vol. 22, Nos. 3-4 (2015), 227-243.
    Pérez, Michelle Salazar and Eloise Williams. “Black Feminist Activism: Theory as
    Generating Collective Resistance,” Multicultural Perspectives, Vol. 16, No. 3
    (2014), 125-132.

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